Rue Britannia

newbritanniaWe’ve got a new word since Britain’s historic EU vote – BREGRET, which is Brexit + Regret.  Also the saying “Rue Britannia.”  I think Britannia has a lot more to rue about than second thoughts.

Why the regret in Britain over the way they voted?   Why go into a referendum not understanding the issues?  It’s unbelievable for such an important issue.

Despite having more knowledge at our finger tips than any other generation, the second top question in Google after the referendum results were out was “What is the EU?”

Seriously?Brexit questions

4Here’s four things about the EU:

The Treaty of Rome enshrined the ‘four freedoms’, requiring the unrestricted circulation of goods, persons, services, and capital. It placed competition at the centre of the European framework. This capitalist utopia clearly involved more than a free trade area.

Much has changed since the 1970s, including the development of the EEC, with nine member states to today’s economic and political union of 28 countries.

Today’s Eurosceptics made four, interconnected, points;

  1. In 1973, the UK agreed to join a loose free trade area. There was no suggestion that they would otherwise suffer any loss of political and economic sovereignty, or be ‘ruled from Brussels’.
  2. Even this change in their national status demanded, as a matter of constitutional principle, that the British people be given a voice in a referendum.
  3. However, that referendum was fought on a false prospectus. The European project was, in truth, a much more extensive attempt by a metropolitan elite (in London and Brussels) to grab power for itself. So there must be a further referendum.
  4. The UK has a bright future outside the EU. Freed from the shackles of European bureaucracy, it will have the best of both worlds. On the one hand, European countries will be compelled to trade with them, because of their economic strength. On the other hand, they will be able much more easily to do business with Asia and the rest of the world.   Source: The case for Brexit: lessons from the 1960s and 1970s

Enoch PowellIt seems the Brits want their country back.  I hear the accusations of xenophobia – but what’s wrong with safeguarding borders, boundaries, rules and laws that are there for a reason?

In April 1968 British politician Enoch Powell warned of the dangers of “communalism”, and specifically of those caused by mass immigration.  Was he right?

enochpowell

 

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